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2023.04.01 13:35 RyanzRetroReviewz The Vikings - 1958 Film Review - RyanzRetroReviewz


The Vikings - 1958

The Vikings is a 1958 epic semi historical/romance movie directed by Richard Fleischer (the son of the great american animatoinnovator and early cartoon producer Max Fleischer, responsible for the creations of Popeye the Sailor man, Betty Boop and many more), who after having spent years in the B movie industry, was now riding high on the success of his Walt Disney produced 1954 adaption of the classic Jules Verne novel "20,000 leagues under the sea" (also starring Kirk Douglas) when he decided to take on the helms of this larger scale and more adult oriendted epic full of love, lust and bloodshed all set in the Viking Age of England and Scandinavia.
With the starring role of this picture going to the mammoth of acting that was Kirk Douglas (although before the more well known "Spartacus" from 1961, this is after he had played the part of Perseus in the 1956 "Ulysseus" movie, so he was already on top), fresh off his hot streak with his new sidekick of a director from "20,000" (Douglas personally hired Fleishcer for this, being that it was his own production company behind the financing). He is non-casually joined by the all time (and/or old time) Hollywood couple Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh (progenitors of the now Scream Queen of old, not to mention still world class beauty, Jamie-Lee Curtis) making this their fifth out of eleven movies together, as well as a big old bowl of Ernest Borgnine dumped on top, having already solidified himself on the big screen as both a well known character actor and a main star. Now, when a movie can boast about having such a combination of high quality talent as this, you know it's bound to be great (although, there are exceptions).
The prologue title sequence of this movie alone is worth note, giving us the audience the pleasure of hearing the stern but soothing (if that makes any sense) voice of the great Orson Welles as he explains to us the whos, whats, whens, and why's of the viking expansions and invasions into the British Isles, as well as the political landscape of England itself at this time in history. This is done as we're shown a bunch of spectacuclar tapestry/parchment paper drawings of Vikings battling against Englishmen, complete with a more than perfectly passionate orchestral theme that invokes the thought of the King Arthur tales of yore, all coming together to add a real sense of authenticity to this epic that we've yet to even see begin...which it does with a bang.
Or the swipe of a sword to be more exact, as the viking leader Ragnar (Borgnine) and his band of warriors fall down upon the camp of the English King Edwin of Northumbria. The two leaders enter into a private duel in the King's tent, with Ragnar slaying his foe and further forcing himself down upon the deadman's wife, Queen Enid, ultimately and unknowingly impregnanting her before disappearing back into the Northlands. Knowing that the child is that of Ragnar's, but will still be seen as a threat to the new King Aella (Frank Thring), Enid gives birth to the child whom she names Eric, in secret and finally sends him away to Italy with her most confident of priests, placing the hilt stone of the King's rightful sword on a rope around his next to later one day be indentified as true heir to the throne of Northumbria.
Years later at the court of King Aella, we come to meet princess Morgana of Wales (Janet Leigh), as her Father pledges her to Aella as a token of alliance between their two kingdoms. King Echbert of Wessex (James Donald) is then brought up on charges of aiding the Vikings in their raids on England's kingdom's in order to protect his own lands, and is thrown into the dungeons to die. We learn that the charges are true when Echbert escapes from Northumbria and finds refuge with the Viking leader Ragnar aboard his longship. The vikings travel back to Scandinavia with Echbert and his promises to continue providing them with coastline and river maps for further raid and plunder.
The incredbily wide shot scenes of the long ships coming into port in the fords of Norway are truly spectacular (clearly being filmed on location), elevated by the realistic built sets that make up the Viking and village (not to mention the ships themselves), as well as the dozens of costumes and hairstyles worn by the extras that are showcased throughout (and a really awesome Viking horn blower welcoming the warriors back home each time, echoing the fantastic sounding orchestral theme of the movie yet again). Also, we now get some of that real over the top barbarian type behaviour being portrayed by Ainar (Douglas), son of Rangar, as we, the mostly uneducated in history average film-goer, would expect out of any and all vikings on screen (it is pretty awesome though); complete with beer guzzling, barell smashing, deranged angry tones, and wishes for barrels of blood to guzzle down instead of that of beer.
Ainar hates all Englishmen, but agrees to his Father and Chieftain's demands to keep after Echbert and see that he wants for nothing. One day while breaking in their hunting hawks, Ainar starts up a confrontation with a slave named Eric (Tony Curtis), the unknowing son of Ragnar, subsequent half brother of Ainar, and true King of Northumbria, who had been abducted from his ship en route to Italy all those years ago. Eric then sicks his own hawk that he's recently found onto his oppressor, leaving Ainar with only one good eye, and himself now with a guaranteed death sentence.
At the feasting hall however, a volva woman steps in against Ragnar's judgement of death, claiming that the gods do not wish for Eric to die by any man's hand, to which Ragnar outsmarts and has Eric taken instead to a rock pool off the coast at high tide to await an eventual death from drowning. Echbert though finds the stone from around Eric's neck and, realizing who he is, goes down to the rock pool to save him and claim him as his own slave in order to keep him safe from Ainar. We also get some more awesome over the top barbarian type behavior, now complete with ass smacking, random kissing orgys, more beer guzzling and axes being thrown at a viking's wife's hair braids to judge wether she's been faithful or not (this movie's about as toxic male chauvinist as it gets, but still... really awesome).
Echbert eventually finishes his maps for the Vikings, as well giving them the idea to abduct and ransom Princess Morgana before her marriage to Aella, with Ainar carrying out the task and giving us a pretty decent battle at sea in the process. Ainar though, now falls madly in love with Morgana and wishes to claim her as his own. When back at the hall once again, we get even more over the top barbarian behavior, beer guzzling, rape jokes, etc, etc, (what do you want from them?, they're Vikings), all this before Ragnar finally concedes to his son's wants and needs, allowing him to claim Morgana as his own. But when Ainar tries to force himself upon her, Eric appears from behind and knocks him out, bringing Morgana to escape with him on a boat to England.
A really-rad boat chase scene ensues through the fog filled fjords, culminating in the collision of both Ragnar and Ainar's boats into one another, sending half of the Vikings to their deaths. All but Ragnar that is, who's saved and pulled onto Eric's boat, heading straight for the King of Northumbria. Ainar swears revenge against Eric, while the two escapees fall madly in love en-route to England.
At the court of King Aella, Eric hands over Ragnar then asks that Morgana be relieved of her pledge of marriage, to which she agrees with. The King demands that she take more time to reflect with her priest, then forces Eric to try to take part in the execution of Ragnar by pushing him into a rabid wolf pit. Eric refuses by cutting Ragnar's bonds and giving him a sword, so that he may die a warrior's death and be aloud to enter Valhalla, giving us an extremely climactic ending of Ernest Borgnine's character in this tale as he raises his arms and voice to summon Odin the All-Father, before jumping to his death in the wolf pit, sword in hand and smile on his face (man Vikings were badass!).
Eric has his hand chopped off as punishment and is set adrift into the sea, but not before the priest -and Morgana find the King's "Pummel-stone" amongst Eric's belongings, coming to the realization that he is the true heir of Northumbria. Morgana then runs in the room just in time to see Eric's amputation, letting out a horrific scream at the sight of it (she wasn't called America's first "Scream Queen" for nothing folks. So this is where Jamie-Lee gets it from eh).
Back in Scandinavia, Ainar is now King of the Vikings, but can't seem to raise an army to retrieve Morgana, until Eric comes back and tells them of Ragnar's death. The two (still unknowing) half brothers now team up to defeat the tyrant King Aella, to both gain revenge for Ragnar and to rescue Morgana, leading the "Great Heathen Army" across the sea to England (in the year of our lord 865 for those of you history buffs).
Between the ships leaving of Scandinavia, and the army's landing and setting up of their assault on Northumbria, you really come to ask yourself as to why film-goers are NEVER treated to such a large scale production as this anymore (well, at least not since The Lord of The Rings as I recall). The amount of extras, costume pieces and props required for this must have been incredible, but all completely necessary in the creation of a full on believable historic setting such as this.
So the Vikings land and lay siege unto Aella's stronghold, battering rams, catapults, axes, spears, swords, the works (not to mention Kirk Douglas scaling the Castle's front door using only axes for leverage. Again, you just don't see stuff like this anymore). Ainar cuts his way through to Morgana's room, but upon realizing that she loves Eric, and that Eric is also a son of Ragnar, he takes her to confront his half brother and fight for their prize.
Eric meets Ainar at the top of the castle and the two enter into an extremely well coordinated battle of the blades, until Ainar breaks Eric's sword that is. But Eric seizes a moment of hesitation that befalls Ainar, and stabs his half brother in the gut with the broken down blade of his sword. Ainar then drops his sword, but Eric picks it up and gives it back to him, again allowing for a true Viking death. He uses the last of his strength in a final roar to summon up Odin, then Ainar is no more. Eric and Morgana embrace each other with love bringing us to the end of this movie, but not before treating the audience to an authentic Viking cremation funeral for Ainar, in which he is cast off to see in a ship and flaming arrows sent flying to the mass. We watch the ship and Ainar's body burn as the credits to "The Vikings" comes up once more, leading us into the ending credits with more authentic looking parchment scroll drawings of the Vikings battling against Englishmen, and finally coming together as one (accompanied again by the awe inspiring orchestral themes of yore every step of the way).
To sum it all up, "The Vikings" (1958) is literally THE - BEST Viking movie that's ever been made. Full of high quality A-list stars (to which I'd say is one of both Kirk's and Tony's coolest characters ever portrayed on screen), and a great group of secondary character actors like James Donald, Frank Thring, Eileen Way and many more. The story is well put together by screenwriters Calder Willingham and Dale Wiserman (based on a novel by Edison Marshall), with the underlying theme being the coming together of two peoples, as well as giving us a pretty cool backstory for a very real and historic time in Northwestern Europe. The wide scale shots and surrounding sceneries caught by DP Jack Cardiff are truly amazing, joined by epic scale (and pretty damn authentic) sets-props-hairstyles and makeups, very well coordinated swordfights and stunts, and lets not forget the awe inspiring orchestral theme of yore laid down by composer Mario Nascimbene and conductor Franco Ferrara. All this is brought together perfectly by director Max Fleischer in what was defenitely the largest scale movie of his career. I would recommend this movie not only to fans of retro cinema, but to anyone who loves epic scale warrior movies, as well as to general ancient world history buffs.
And that's all she wrote folks. Thanks for reading.
Ryan D. Hurley
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2023.04.01 12:41 Dryear2471 sexy MILF Arya Grander with hot NATURAL BOOBS wearing LATEX Hallooween costume teasing

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2023.04.01 07:44 shafwandito When buying/choosing skin, what kind of skin do you prefer?

Is it Elegance, which show how classy they are? Is it Horni Sexy, which show how fit they are? Is it Unique, which show unusual costume they use (like Kroos halloween skin)? Or is it Casual, which show a glimpse of their daily life looks like (E.g Perfurmer Test collection skin)?
View Poll
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2023.04.01 00:41 5ammyy Does anyone else dislike how beefy the man characters in SF are?

Character design is a great tool for expressing who a character is. From silhouette and body proportions, to costume, to colour palette, to animation and body language, to framing; there are so many ways you express a character through their appearance. I feel that a good character design tells you some key information about a character even without knowing anything else.
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A good example is Chun Li character design choices. Chinese traditional dress with wrists weights, the feminine, pure heroess; the strongest woman in the world; the strong willed, and tenacious upholder of justice. Her outfits, her expressions, her body language, her writing, it all ties together to form a cohesive character. You could take someone who knew literally nothing about Street Fighter, show them any render of Chin Li, and they'd understand who she is as a character.
Can't really do that with the male characters. Closest is DJ, where they'd be able to guess that he is musical artist, but that's about it. With Guile you'd get "that he is an American sex object" with that tight butt and jacked shoulders. With Ryu you'd think he is some kind of sex deviant the way he is almost always half naked. Lets not even talk about Gief who is always flexing his big voluptuous muscles, in his tight shorts. Making every male that much envious of his gifted manhood. And Ken with his blonde hair and sometimes blue eyes, wealthy, good looks, business man, playboy and fighter.
And a character can be sexy without you needing to show off their vascular arms bulge and bulging muscles. There's a big difference between sexuality and sexualisation. You don't need to make characters chaste and devoid of any sexuality. But you don't need to shove it in where it does nothing for the character.
Yeah, a lot of SF's female characters are really sexy. But a lot of them are sexy in different ways: compare Chun Li or Juri to anyone else, for example. Their body shape is totally different. But every man is huge, with big muscles, small hips, thick neck, big traps, perfectly symmetrical. All the same body shape. They could adjust proportions to reflect a character but they don't.
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2023.04.01 00:36 yahboosnubs Here are the least popular films nominated for each oscar, according to letterboxd

its cheating if i only include movies from the 20s that no one has seen in 90 years, so ill include movies from both before and after the first 3 years of the oscars.
Have you heard of any of these films?
pic- the white parade
director- victor schertzinger one night of love (1934) / frank lloyd drag (1929)
actor- dan dailey when my baby smiles at me (1948) / richard barthlemess the noose (1927)
actress- Gladys george Valiant Is the Word for Carrie (1936)/ betty compton the barker (1928)
supporting actress- Shirley Knight The Dark at the Top of the Stairs (1960)
supporting actor- J carrol nash A Medal for Benny 1945
original screenplay- What Next, Corporal Hargrove? 1945
adapted screenplay- holy matrimony 1943 / the cop 1929
Story- a cage of nightingales 1947
Foreign- dust of life
Animated- Chico and Rita
Documentary- d-day remembered
Docu short- the children of soong ching king
Live action short- wee water wonders
Ani short- rippling romance
Score- hitchhike to happiness (least popular non docu/short overall)
Song- youth on parade 1942
Sound mixing- 3 is a family 1945
Sound editing- the lively set 1964
Ad/pd- the awakening 1929, the magnificent sarah 1976
Cinematography- stagecoach to fury 1956
Make-up- happy new year 1987
Costume- wives and lovers 1963
Editing- crazylegs 1953
Visual effects- Tobruk 1967
dance direction- king of burlesque 1936
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